Sample Classes

Experience what learning is like in USP! Participate in any of our 6 sample classes, conducted via Zoom, below. To ensure that the sessions will be engaging, there will be limited slots available. 

4 Mar 2021 , Thu

2.00pm - 3.00pm

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Sciences and Technologies

#1 Natural History and its Colonial Past

by Dr Ang Yuchen 

Dr Ang Yuchen is a Museum Officer at the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum, where he curates the entomological (insect collection). (In fact, Dr Ang is a USP alum from Class of 2007!) He is also behind the database of animals and plants of Singapore - check out here! He will be sharing about the museum's collections, issues surrounding them, repatriations, and challenges museums face in the current climate.

4 Mar 2021 , Thu

8.00pm - 9.00pm

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Humanities and Social Sciences

#2 Language Diversity and Language Death

by A/P Peter Vail 

Linguists and Anthropologists predict that of the thousands of human languages spoken throughout the world today, most will disappear within your lifetime—a phenomenon called ‘Language Death’. But what exactly does it mean for a language to die? How does this happen? And why does it it matter? In this sample class, we will consider the nature of language, the causes of language death, and the implications of losing our linguistic diversity.

5 Mar 2021 , Fri

2.00pm - 3.00pm

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Writing and Critical Thinking

#3 A (Brief) History of Scientific Vision

by Dr Kathryn McHarry

In this sample class drawn from “Writing and Critical Thinking: The Social Life of Science”, students will be introduced to the surprisingly short history of objectivity in scientific observation. What values did early scientists rely upon before objectivity? Is objectivity always a desirable value today? Together, we will examine several fascinating scientific images and practice writing up evidence-based claims about the human values they represent.

5 Mar 2021 , Fri

8.00pm - 9.00pm

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Humanities and Social Sciences

#4 Multidisciplinary Perspectives on 'Mind'

by A/P Donald Favareau

The Multidisciplinary Perspectives on 'Mind' module explores such still unanswered questions as: How could the purely physical and chemical components of the brain produce such seemingly non-physical and chemical phenomena as thoughts, beliefs, desires, imagination, contemplation, self-reflection and a sense of ourselves as being more than just the exchange of ions and their resulting voltage changes across cell membranes?  How might such a 'mind' have arisen evolutionarily? Do animals have 'minds' like ours? And might we someday build such 'minds' into artificially intelligent agents, such as robots and computer systems?

 

This sample class will be a brief overview of just some of the perplexing issues that one confronts when trying to understand the still poorly understood concept of 'mind', and hopefully leave you with a good deal more questions and uncertainty at the end of it than you came into it with at the beginning.

6 Mar 2021 , Sat

10.00am - 11.00am

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Quantitative Reasoning Foundation

#5 Making Sense of Our Environment

by Dr Edmund Low

Our environment impacts our well-being, be it the air we breathe or the water we swim in. What are the health risks that pollution can pose, and how does it affect our way of life? In this sample class, we will explore how we can take a quantitative approach towards tackling these questions. 

6 Mar 2021 , Sat

2.00pm - 3.00pm

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Humanities and Social Sciences

#6 Low-skilled Labour Migration 

by Dr Leung Wing Sze

Low-skilled labour migration is an increasingly prominent phenomenon in the globalised world, whereby migrant workers usually fill the 3Ds positions (i.e. dirty, dangerous, demeaning) in destination countries. What problems do low-skilled migrants encounter? Which academic theories can we draw on to explain a way forward?